Casamarina Lab x SuperDuper Hats

WHO ARE YOU?

(WHO YOU ARE DOESN'T MEAN WHAT YOU DO;

THIS IS THE SECOND QUESTION)

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I consider myself as an artivist and a multi-local.

I truly believe in the power of art to bring the community together, and strengthen the communities.

What do you do? Where do you live?

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After almost 8 years in Florence, I moved to Marrakech where I currently live and work.

I’m Exhibitions Director at the Museum of African Contemporary Art Al Maaden Marrakech (MACAAL), as well as co-organizer and Vice-President of Black History Month Florence in Italy.

My multilocal heart instead lives and belongs to many places.

TELL ME YOUR SECRET

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Oscar Wilde said “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself”, and I think I stand for that.

Secrets can be a burden, for the sake of my own peace of mind I try not to carry any.

Still, I will share a little one with you.

My professional character can be very serious, but the truth is I’m actually a big fan and consumer of gifs and memes, and I’m addicted to TV shows!

On a serious note, my curatorial practice is deeply rooted in the everyday life and interactions, I always find the title of an exhibition while reading a book, listening to music, watching a movie, traveling, dancing...

I co-curated a show in Florence entitled "SCHENGEN" almost two years ago, I came up with the title while traveling to Italy from Morocco.

I remember how I felt when the plane landed and I saw a bunch of policemen waiting at the exit of the plane, all the non Schengen passengers were put aside and controlled right away, all of them were Moroccans or Subsaharians...

Witnessing such scene didn't feel right to me, it was quite unfair. After that, I naturally suggested that title. 

Schengen is a three part exhibition that examines the limitations of socio-cultural and political borders through a totemic memorialization of the migration of bodies and goods.

Drawing upon transnational identity and the blue water of the Mediterranean as fluid conceptions of legality and humanity, the works problematize the values instilled by international agreements whose fallen fruits too often die on the vine.